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Topic: Research, Studies and Reports

Posts regarding research, studies, reports and thought leadership concerning addiction and recovery.

The Harms of Constructing Addiction as a Chronic, Relapsing Brain Disease

June 24th, 2022|

As an international network of historians and social scientists who study approaches to the management of drugs across time and place, we have noticed the effort to redefine addiction as a chronic, relapsing brain disease (CRBD). The CRBD model is promoted as a route to destigmatize addiction and to empower individuals to access treatment that works within that model’s terms.1 CRBD usefully recognizes that brain-based neural adaptations place individual brains in chronic states of readiness to relapse. But brains are housed inside of people. Substance use is biological, social, and political; our concepts and approaches to complex questions surrounding substance use must be, too.2,3 By overlooking the sociopolitical dynamics and inequalities bound up with substance use, the CRBD model can paradoxically further marginalize people who use drugs by positing them as neurobiologically incapable of agency or choice. We are concerned that the CRBD model paints drug users as individuals whose exclusion from social, economic, and political participation is justified by their biological flaws and damaged brains.

A Review of Buprenorphine Diversion and Misuse Internationally

June 22nd, 2022|

Abstract

Outpatient opioid addiction treatment with sublingual buprenorphine pharmacotherapy (OBOT) has rapidly expanded in the United States and abroad, and, with this increase in medication availability, there have been increasing concerns about its diversion, misuse and related harms. This narrative review defines the behaviors of diversion and misuse, examines how the pharmacology of buprenorphine alone and in combination with naloxone influence its abuse liability, and describes the epidemiological data on buprenorphine diversion and intravenous misuse, risk factors for its intravenous misuse and the unintended consequences of misuse and diversion.

Study of buprenorphine diversion cautions against its misuse

June 10th, 2022|

Buprenorphine is approved in many countries for the treatment of opioid use disorder (OUD), but problems with diversion and abuse exist. There is a need to understand how and why patients use diverted buprenorphine, and whether barriers to access contribute to illicit use.

58% reported a history of diverted buprenorphine use, with 37% never receiving a prescription. Approximately one-half (52%) reported using buprenorphine to get high or alter mood, but few (4%) indicated that it was their drug of choice.

Scientists Say Your “Mind” Isn’t Confined to Your Brain, or Even Your Body

May 27th, 2022|

What is a mind? Defining the concept is a surprisingly slippery task. The mind is the seat of consciousness, the essence of your being. Without a mind, you cannot be considered meaningfully alive. So what exactly, and where precisely, is it? This new understanding has potentially broad implications for the field of addiction and treatment.

SAMHSA Treatment Website Contains Inaccurate Information, Experts Say

May 20th, 2022|

The national government website designed to help people find addiction treatment contains inaccurate and outdated information, addiction experts tell Kaiser Health News. The site, Findtreatment.gov, has information about more than 13,000 state-licensed treatment facilities, including what types of services are provided, which insurance plans the facilities accept and what ages they serve.

Congress weighs in on pharma industry conflicts of interest

May 18th, 2022|

Global consulting leader McKinsey & Company drew unwanted attention in 2020 when a bankruptcy proceeding revealed that it guided the marketing strategy for disgraced opioid seller Purdue Pharma. Now McKinsey is under scrutiny from Congress after revelations that at least 22 employees who were consulting for Purdue and other opioid producers were also doing work for government agencies tasked with regulating opioid use.

Study: Natural Recovery from Alcohol and Drug Problems

May 10th, 2022|

The study is titled: Natural recovery from alcohol and drug problems: methodological review of the research with suggestions for future directions and published in PubMed.gov. Aims: The methodology of studies that reported data on individuals who recovered from an alcohol or other drug problem (cigarette smokers were excluded) without formal help or treatment were reviewed. Conclusions: Based on this review, future natural recovery studies should: (a) report respondents' demographic characteristics at the time of their recovery; (b) describe respondents' pre-recovery problem severity; (c) explore in some depth what factors, events or processes are associated with the self-change process; (d) provide corroboration of respondents' self-reports; (e) examine factors related to the maintenance of recoveries; (f) conduct interviews with individuals who have naturally recovered from cocaine, marijuana and polydrug abuse; (g) include a second interview at a later time to examine stability of natural recoveries; and (h) require a minimum 5-year recovery time frame.

There is life after addiction. Most people recover.

April 12th, 2022|

The U.S. faces an unprecedented surge of drug deaths, with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting another grim milestone this week. In a single 12-month period, fatal overdoses claimed 101,623 lives. But researchers and drug policy experts say the grim toll obscures an important and hopeful fact: Most Americans who experience alcohol and drug addiction survive. They recover and go on to live full and healthy lives.

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